Tag Archive: laboratory


Blood Chemistry

It’s been almost a year since my last consultation at H4. When I got back to the Philippines from my vacation, I prioritized my check-up. I went to H4 to have myself scheduled for my second CD4 count. Dra. A scheduled me for February 17 and then gave a prescription to have my blood chemistry tested.

I had my blood extracted this morning in a hospital in QC and I got the result before I went home from work. The results are still normal based on the normal values. But there’s a slight deviation from my baseline. I have yet to get my dad’s opinion on this.

Now Baseline
FBS 4.56 4.78
Urea Nitrogen 14.9 7.8
Creatinine 0.9 0.86
Uric Acid 5.96
Cholesterol 4.51
Triglycerides 0.69
SGOT 31.9 23.6
SGPT 28.6 35.9

I will have to visit H4 on Thursday to get my CD4 count result. I’m hoping that the count won’t be too low. I don’t want to take ARV medication yet.

Here’s a little primer (with links) on what the blood chemistry tests are for:

FBS
A fasting blood sugar (FBS) level is one of the tests used to diagnose diabetes mellitus (another being the oral glucose tolerance test). In a person with symptoms of osmotic diuresis and an elevated fasting blood sugar level, the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is usually made.

According to the 2005 Recommendation of the ADA, you may interpret your fasting blood sugar as follows:
FBS < 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l) = normal fasting blood sugar;
FBS 100–125 mg/dl (5.6–6.9 mmol/l) = IFG (impaired fasting glucose);
FBS ≥ 126 mg/dl (7.0 mmol/l) = provisional diagnosis of diabetes

Urea Nitrogen
A BUN test is done to see how well your kidneys  are working. If your kidneys are not able to remove urea from the blood normally, your BUN level rises. Heart failure, dehydration, or a diet high in protein can also make your BUN level higher. Liver disease or damage can lower your BUN level. A low BUN level can occur normally in the second or third trimester of pregnancy.

Creatinine
Creatinine and creatinine clearance tests measure the level of the waste product creatinine in your blood and urine. These tests tell how well your kidneys are working. The substance creatine is formed when food is changed into energy through a process called metabolism. Creatine is broken down into another substance called creatinine, which is taken out of your blood by the kidneys and then passed out of your body in urine. See a picture of the kidneys .
Creatinine is made at a steady rate and is not affected by diet or by normal physical activities. If your kidneys are damaged and cannot work normally, the amount of creatinine in your urine goes down while its level in your blood goes up.

Uric Acid
The blood uric acid test measures the amount of uric acid in a blood sample. Uric acid is produced from the natural breakdown of your body’s cells and from the foods you eat.

Most of the uric acid is filtered out by the kidneys and passes out of the body in urine. A small amount passes out of the body in stool. But if too much uric acid is being produced or if the kidneys are not able to remove it from the blood normally, the level of uric acid in the blood increases.
High levels of uric acid in the blood can cause solid crystals to form within joints. This causes a painful condition called gout. If gout remains untreated, these uric acid crystals can build up in the joints and nearby tissues, forming hard lumpy deposits called tophi. High levels of uric acid may also cause kidney stones or kidney failure.

Cholesterol / Triglycerides
Your blood cholesterol level has a lot to do with your chances of getting heart disease. High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. A risk factor is a condition that increases your chance of getting a disease. In fact, the higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart disease or having a heart attack. Heart disease is the number one killer of women and men in the United States. Each year, more than a million Americans have heart attacks, and about a half million people die from heart disease.

SGOT / SGPT
An initial step in detecting liver damage is a simple blood test to determine the presence of certain liver enzymes (proteins) in the blood. Under normal circumstances, these enzymes reside within the cells of the liver. But when the liver is injured for any reason, these enzymes are spilled into the blood stream. Enzymes are proteins that are present throughout the body, each with a unique function. Enzymes help to speed up (catalyze) routine and necessary chemical reactions in the body.

Among the most sensitive and widely used liver enzymes are the aminotransferases. They include aspartate aminotransferase (AST or SGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT or SGPT). These enzymes are normally contained within liver cells. If the liver is injured or damaged, the liver cells spill these enzymes into the blood, raising the enzyme levels in the blood and signaling the liver disease.

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test results…

Here’s the result of my lab tests last week. Overall, I’m normal except that I have Urinary Tract Infection (WBC count in my Urinalysis). Can’t wait to get my actual CD4 count on Thursday. I’m hoping that I still don’t need to take ARV medication and that I have a high CD4 cell count.

VDRL/RPR – Non-reactive
HBsAg – Non-reactive

Hematology
Hemoglobin – 173
Hematocrit – 0.51
RBC – 5.4
WBC – 8.25
Neutrophils – 0.55
Lymphocytes – 0.44
Eosinophils – 0.01
Platelet count – adequate

Blood Chemistry
FBS – 4.78
Urea Nitrogen – 7.80
Creatinine – 0.86
SGOT – 23.6
SGPT – 35.9
ALK Phosphatase – 170

Chest PA
No active lung infiltrates seen
Heart is not enlarged
Trachea is midline
Diaphragm, Sulci, and Ribs are unremarkable

Urinalysis
Color – yellow
Transparency – Slightly Hazy
Reaction – Acidic
Specific Gravity – 1.015
pH – 6.5
Sugar – Negative
Protein – Negative
WBC – 8-12
RBC – 0-1
Mucus Threads – moderate
Epithelial Cells – rare
Bacteria – rare